Advent Day 4 – Romford High Street photograph

In the run up to Christmas we’ll show some of the objects added to the Museum’s collection in the last 12 months. These objects will be on display at the Museum until we close for Christmas on 16th December.IMG_08712

This photograph is a snapshot of the far end of Romford High Street that is almost cut off now from the half outside the museum. Recorded in this photograph are some of the many 18th and 19th century houses and premises lost during Romford’s redevelopment in the latter half of the 20th century. Identifiable businesses include Jubilee Coffee Tavern, W. Barrow, and Frank J. Dully plumber (one shop either side). The children were probably paid to pose.

Donated by Janice Agg
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Advent Day 3 – Mashiter’s Walk photograph, 1929

In the run up to Christmas we’ll show some of the objects added to the Museum’s collection in the last 12 months. These objects will be on display at the Museum until we close for Christmas on 16th December.

20 Objects 06 2017 Mashiter's Walk Photograph (2)

This photograph, probably taken in Mashiter’s Walk, shows a group of labourers following the completion of the street.  The Marshalls Park area of Romford was developed on the grounds of Marshalls Park House, itself demolished and built over in 1959.  The donor’s father is sat fourth from left in the photograph.

Donated by Peter Ray
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Advent Day 2 – Peek Bros. milk bottle

In the run up to Christmas we’ll show some of the objects added to the Museum’s collection in the last 12 months. These objects will be on display at the Museum until we close for Christmas on 16th December.

20 Objects 03 Peek Brothers Bottle (2)

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This milk bottle was supplied by Peek Brothers of Widdrington Farm in Noak Hill. This farm was created in the 1870s -1880s following the amalgamation of two smaller farms that had medieval origins. Widdrington Farm was formerly known as Joys Farm and still exists today.  This bottle would ordinarily have been cleaned and returned to the dairy. However it is one of many such bottles the donor excavated from a former brick clay pit, later used as a rubbish tip, upon which his property was built.

 Donated by Mr. Thorne
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Advent Day 1 – Goss dragon bowl

In the run up to Christmas we’ll show some of the objects added to the Museum’s collection in the last 12 months. These objects will be on display at the Museum until we close for Christmas on 16th December.

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This bowl would have been a souvenir from someone’s journey to Havering-atte-Bower, the historic heart of the Liberty of Havering. W.H. Goss was one of a number of potters who produced souvenir china artefacts at his factory in Stoke-on-Trent.  He began manufacturing in the 1850s and continued until the beginning of the Second World War when souvenirs such as this fell out of fashion. This particular bowl is based on a Norwegian dragon-shaped beer bowl.  Notice the misspelling of ‘Bowre’.

Donated by Marion Rist
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Did you know? – Rainham

Rainham is one of the most historic areas in Havering, if not the whole country. Not only does it have its roots going back to the Saxon period, there is strong evidence of a settlement before that with a Neolithic (or the new Stone Age dating back some 4,000-2,500 BC) site discovered west of Launders Lane in 1963. There are also remains of a Neolithic forest close to the mouth of the Mardyke River in Rainham Marshes.

An Anglo/Saxon burial ground from the 6th and 7th Centuries was discovered during excavations at Gerpins Lane Pit in 1930. A precious collections of objects such as swords, brooches, rings, spear heads and a pair of drinking horns were unearthed, as well as indications of earlier burials.

The original drinking horns are in the British Museum, but there is an exact copy on display in the Rainham Case in the Museum. Today the burial site is under the Gerpins Lane Tip in Gerpins Lane, Upminster. Archaeologists and local historians have often wondered what wealth of other priceless Saxon artefacts are still buried underneath the mounds of household rubbish at one of Havering’s official tips.

During the Middle Ages, the settlement of Rainham was grouped around the church of St. Helen and St. Giles. This is the oldest building in Havering, built in 1170. Among its many original features is a rare engraving of a medieval ship at anchor etched in the wall of a stairwell.

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A ROMFORD MAN’S ART

The amazing work of Romford artist Stephen O’Neill is currently on display at a new Exhibition at Havering Museum, in the High Street.

Stephen is largely self-taught, and he took up art to occupy his time.

He attends Fairkytes Arts Centre in Hornchurch and the Havering Association for People with Disabilities.

Among his work on display at the Museum are portraits of film stars Sharon Stone, James Dean and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Also music icons Paul McCartney, John Lennon and Robbie Williams.

Most of Stephen’s pictures are for sale at reasonable prices and would make ideal Christmas presents.

“We are proud to have given local artist Stephen the opportunity to display his work at the Museum in the build up to Christmas,” says Chairman Peter Stewart. “His work is incredible when you consider the disabilities he has had to overcome. I do hope the Exhibition attracts the large audience it deserves and serves as an incentive to other local artists to reach this standard.”

The Exhibition is on at Havering Museum until Saturday 16th December 2017.

The Museum is open Wednesday to Saturday 11.00am-5.00pm (last admission to the Galleries 4.00pm….Shop 4.30pm).

For more information on Stephen’s Exhibition call: 01708 766 571
The Exhibition Room is closed occasionally for events and private bookings so please call first if you are coming especially to see the exhibition.

Posted in #HaveringMuseum, Art, Exhibitions, Havering, Havering Association for People with Disabilities. (HAD), havering museum, Havering Museum, Painting, Romford Artist, Stephen O'Neill, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Did you know?… Romford High Street

The Havering Museum is situated in part of the old Romford Brewery Building, in the High Street, that dates back to the 1700s. Most people in Havering are familiar with the building and many will have worked there for Ind Coope at some time before it closed in 2001.

However, most people would not be aware that the High Street was the old Roman Road 9,that stretched from Mile End in London to Romford, Chelmsford, Colchester and Norwich.

It was obviously the main route for the Romans travelling Road 9 to and from London to Colchester. It is also very likely there was a staging post for the Roman legions to rest after a long march from London on the outskirts of Romford, called Durolitum.

The High Road would also have been travelled by the Saxon Warrior Queen, Boudicca, on her way to attack London after sacking Colchester.

Our Kings and Queens of England, from Edward the Confessor to Charles 1st used the High Street on their journeys to and from the country’s first Royal Palace at Havering-atte-Bower. That included Elizabeth 1st, who probably visited Romford on many occasions and Henry V111 whose children were educated at Gidea Hall.

Posted in #HaveringMuseum, 19th Century, Beer, Brewery, Did You Know?, Essex, Havering, havering museum, Havering Museum, Local history, Market, Romans, Romford, Uncategorized | Leave a comment